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Cosmetic Surgery

: Plastic Surgery Welcome to Landauer CosmeticSurgeryCosmeticSurgery Procedures Your Cosmetic Surgeon0800 085 1913 Welcome to Landauer CosmeticSurgeryCosmeticSurgery Procedures Breast surgery, facelifts, liposuction, rhinoplasty and otoplasty. First Cosmetics work with speciailist cosmetic surgeons throughout the UK. Specialising in obesity surgery as well. Click here. Breast surgery, liposuction, collagen injections and much more. Nationwide Cosmetics work with specialist surgeons throughout the UK. Enquire online for more information.

... e a rabbit. Still "Lovey" is something of a nomenclatural tin can on the tail of one's self respect. At a quiet place on a safe street I tightened the line of my custodian in front of an attractive, refined saloon. I made a dead-ahead scramble for the doors, whining like a dog in the press despatches that lets the family know that little Alice is bogged while gathering lilies in the brook. "Why, darn my eyes," says the old man, with a grin; "darn my eyes if the saffron-coloured son of a seltzer lemonade ain't asking me in to take a drink. Lemme cosmetic surgery see--how long's it been since I saved shoe leather by keeping one foot on the foot-rest? I believe I'll--" I knew I had him. Hot Scotches he took, sitting at a table. For an hour he kept the Campbells coming. I sat by his side rapping for the waiter with my tail, and eating free lunch such as mamma in her flat never equalled with her homemade truck bought cosmetic surgery at a delicatessen store eight minutes before papa comes home. When the products of Scotland were all exhausted except the rye bread the old man unwound me from the table leg and played me

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outside like a fisherman plays a salmon. Out there he took off my collar and threw it into the street. "Poor doggie," says he; "good doggie. She shan't kiss you any more. 'S a darned shame.

Good doggie, go away and get run over by a street car and be happy." I refused to leave. I leaped and frisked around the old man's legs happy as a pug on a rug. "You old flea-headed woodchuck-chaser," I said to him--"you moon-baying, rabbit-pointing, egg-stealing old beagle, can't you see that I don't want to leave you? Can't you see that we're both Pups in the Wood and the missis is the cruel uncle after you with the dish towel and me with the flea liniment and a pink bow to tie on my tail. Why not cut that all out and be pards forever more?" Maybe you'll say he didn't understand--maybe he didn't. But he kind of got a grip on the Hot Scotches, and stood still for a minute, thinking. "Doggie," says he, finally, "we don't live more than a dozen lives on this earth, and very few of us live to be more than 300. If I ever see that flat any more I'm a flat, and if you do you're flatter; and that's no flattery. I'm offering 60 to 1 that Westward Ho wins out by the length of a dachshund." There was no string, but I frolicked along with my master to the Twenty-third street ferry.

And the cats on the route saw reason to give thanks that prehensile claws had been given them. On the Jersey side my master said to a stranger who stood eating a currant bun: "Me and my doggie, we are bound for the Rocky Mountains." But what pleased me most was when my old man pulled both of my ears until I howled, and said: "You common, monkey-headed, rat-tailed, sulphur-coloured son of a door mat, do you know what I'm going to call you?" I thought of "Lovey," and I whined dolefully. "I'm going to call you 'Pete,'" says my master; and if I'd had five tails I couldn't have done enough

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wagging to do justice to the occasion. THE LOVE-PHILTRE OF IKEY SCHOENSTEIN The Blue Light Drug Store is downtown, between the Bowery and First Avenue, where the distance between the two streets is the shortest. The Blue Light does not consider that pharmacy is a thing of bric-a-brac, scent and ice-cream soda. If you ask it for cosmetic surgery pain-killer it will not give you a bonbon. The Blue Light scorns the labour-saving arts of modern pharmacy. It macerates its opium and percolates its own laudanum and paregoric. To this day pills are made behind its tall prescription desk--pills rolled out on its own pill-tile, divided with a spatula, rolled with the finger and thumb, dusted with calcined magnesia and delivered in little round pasteboard pill-boxes. The store is on a corner about which coveys of ragged-plumed, hilarious children play and become candidates for the cough drops and soothing syrups that wait for them inside. Ikey Schoenstein was the night clerk of

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the Blue Light and the friend of his customers. Thus it is on the East Side, where the heart of pharmacy is not glacщ. There, as it should be, the druggist is a counsellor, a confessor, an adviser, an able and willing missionary and mentor whose learning is respected, whose occult wisdom is venerated and whose medicine is often poured, untasted, into the gutter. Therefore Ikey's corniform, be-spectacled nose and narrow, knowledge-bowed figure was well known in the vicinity of the Blue Light, and his advice and notice were much desired. Ikey roomed and breakfasted at Mrs. Riddle's two squares away. Mrs. Riddle had a daughter named Rosy. The circumlocution has been in vain--you must have guessed it--Ikey adored Rosy.

She tinctured all his thoughts; she was the compound extract of all that was chemically pure and officinal--the dispensatory contained nothing equal to her. But Ikey was timid, and his hopes remained insoluble in the menstruum of his backwardness and fears. Behind his counter he was a superior being, calmly conscious of special knowledge and worth; outside he was a weak-kneed, purblind, motorman-cursed rambler, with ill-fitting clothes stained with chemicals and smelling of socotrine aloes and valerianate of cosmetic surgery ammonia. The fly in Ikey's ointment (thrice welcome, pat trope!) was Chunk McGowan. Mr. McGowan was also striving to catch the bright smiles tossed about by Rosy. But he was no outfielder as Ikey was; he picked them off the bat. At the same time he was Ikey's friend and customer, and often dropped in at the Blue Light Drug Store to have a bruise painted with iodine or get a cut rubber-plastered after a pleasant evening spent along the Bowery. One afternoon McGowan drifted in in his silent, easy way, and sat, comely, smooth-faced, hard, indomitable, good-natured, upon a stool. "Ikey," said he, when his friend had fetched his mortar and sat opposite, grinding gum benzoin to a powder, "get busy with your ear. It's drugs for me if you've got the line I need." Ikey scanned the countenance of Mr. McGowan for the usual evidences of conflict, but found none. "Take your coat off," he ordered. "I guess already that you have been stuck in the ribs with a knife. I have many times told you those Dagoes would do you up." Mr. McGowan smiled. "Not them," he said. "Not any Dagoes.

But you've located the diagnosis all right enough--it's under my coat, near the ribs. Say! Ikey--Rosy and me are goin' to run away and get married to-night." Ikey's left forefinger was doubled over the edge of the mortar, holding it steady. He gave it a wild rap with the pestle, but felt it not. Meanwhile Mr. McGowan's smile faded to a look of perplexed gloom. "That is," he continued, "if she keeps in the notion until the time comes. We've been layin' pipes for the getaway for two weeks. One day she says she will; the same evenin' she says nixy. We've agreed on to-night, and Rosy's stuck to the affirmative this time for two whole days. But it's five hours yet till the time, and I'm afraid she'll stand me up when it comes to the scratch." "You said you wanted drugs," remarked Ikey. Mr. McGowan looked ill at ease and harassed--a condition opposed to

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his usual line of demeanour. He made a patent-medicine almanac into a roll and fitted it with unprofitable carefulness about his finger. "I wouldn't have this double handicap make a false start to-night for a million," he said. "I've got a little flat up in Harlem all ready, with chrysanthemums on the table and a kettle ready to boil. And I've engaged a pulpit pounder to be ready at his house for us at 9.30. It's got to come off. And if Rosy don't change her mind again!"--Mr. McGowan ceased, a prey to his doubts. "I don't see then yet," said Ikey, shortly, "what makes it that you talk of drugs, or what I cosmetic surgery can be

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doing about it." "Old man Riddle don't like me a little bit," went on the uneasy suitor, bent upon marshalling his arguments. "For a week he hasn't let Rosy step outside the door with me. If it wasn't for losin' a boarder they'd have bounced me long ago. cosmetic surgery I'm makin' $20 a week and she'll never regret flyin' the coop with Chunk McGowan." "You will excuse me, Chunk," said Ikey. "I must make a prescription that is to be called for soon." "Say," said McGowan, looking up suddenly, "say, Ikey, ain't there a drug of some kind--some kind of powders that'll make a girl like you better if you give 'em to her?" Ikey's lip beneath his nose curled with ThirdPart400_500 the scorn of superior enlightenment; but before he could answer, cosmetic surgery McGowan continued: "Tim Lacy told me he got some once from a croaker uptown and fed 'em to his girl in soda water. From the very first dose he was ace-high and everybody else looked like thirty cents to her. They was married in less than two weeks." Strong and simple was Chunk McGowan. A better reader of men than Ikey was could have seen that his tough frame was strung upon fine wires. Like a good general who was about to invade the enemy's territory he was seeking to guard every point against possible failure. "I thought," went on Chunk hopefully, "that if I had one of them powders to give Rosy when I see her at supper to-night it might brace her up and keep her from reneging on the proposition to skip. I guess she don't need a mule team to drag her away, but women are better at coaching than they are at running bases. If the stuff'll work just for a couple of hours it'll do the trick." "When is this foolishness of running away to be happening?" asked Ikey. "Nine o'clock," said Mr. McGowan. "Supper's at seven. At eight Rosy goes to bed with a headache. At n ...

 
   
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