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... " demanded Montgomery. "His reply resembles a press dispatch. He has tried to make himself thoroughly clear, and if there is anything buying car left unsaid it is past our comprehension. I am sorry to inform you, though, that he has paid the telegraph charges," said Mr. Grant, smiling broadly. "Is ThirdPart400_500 he rational about it?" asked Montgomery, nervously. Mr. Grant gave his partner a quick, significant glance, and then drew from his desk the voluminous telegram from Swearengen Jones. It was as follows: October 2. GRANT & RIPLEY, Yucatan Building, New York. I am to be sole referee in this matter. You are retained as my agents, heir to report to me through you weekly. One desire of uncle was to forestall grandfather's bequest. I shall respect that desire. Enforce terms rigidly. He was my best friend and trusted me with disposition of all this money. Shall attend to it sacredly. Heir must get rid of money left to him in given time. Out of respect to memory of uncle he must take no one into his confidence. Don't want world to think S. was damned fool. He wasn't. Here are rules I want him to work under: 1. No reckless gambling. 2. No idiotic Board of Trade speculation. 3. No endowments to institutions of any character, because their memory would be an invisible asset. 4. No indiscriminate giving away of funds. By that I don't mean him to be stingy. I hate a stingy man and so did J.T.S. 5. No more than ordinary dissipation. I hate a saint. So did J.T.S. And both of us sowed an oat or two. 6. No excessive donations to charity. If he gives as other millionaires do I'll let it go at that. Don't believe charity should be spoiled by indulgence. It is not easy to spend a million, and I won't be unreasonable with him. Let him spend it freely, but not foolishly, and get his money's worth out of it. If he does that I'll consider him a good business man. I regard it foolish to tip waiter more than a dollar and car porter does not deserve over five. He does not earn more than one. If heir wants to try for the big stake he'd better begin quick, because he might slip up if he buying car waits until day of judgment. It's less than year off. Luck to him. Will write you more fully. S. JONES. "Write more fully!" echoed Montgomery.

"What can there be left to write about?" "He is explicit," said the attorney, "but it is best to know all the conditions before you decide. Have you made up your mind?" Brewster sat for a long time, staring hard at the floor. A great struggle was going on in his mind. "It's a gamble, and a big one," he said at last, squaring his shoulders, "but I'll take it. I don't want to appear disloyal to my grandfather, but I think that even he would advise me to accept. Yes, you may write Mr. Jones that I accept the chance." The attorneys complimented him on his

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nerve, and wished ThirdPart400_500 him success.

Brewster turned with a smile. "I'll begin by asking what you think a reasonable fee for an attorney in a case of this kind. I hope you will act for me." "You don't want to spend it all in a lump, do you?" asked Mr. Grant, smiling. "We can hardly act as counsel for both you and buying car Mr. Jones." "But I must have a lawyer, and the will limits the number of my confidants. What am I to do?" "We will consult Mr. Jones in regard to the buying car question. It is not regular, you see, but I apprehend no legal difficulties. We cannot accept fees from both sides, however," said Mr. Grant. "But I want attorneys who are willing to help me.

It won't be a help if you decline to accept my money." "We'll resort to arbitration," laughed Ripley. Before night Montgomery Brewster began a career that would have startled the

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world had the facts been known. With true loyalty to the "Little Sons of the Rich," he asked his friends to dinner and opened their eyes. "Champagne!" cried Harrison, as they were seated at table. "I can't remember the last time I had champagne." "Naturally," laughed "Subway" Smith. "You couldn't remember anything after that." As the dinner progressed Brewster explained that he intended to double his fortune within a year. "I'm going to have some fun, too,"

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he said, "and you boys are to help me." "Nopper" Harrison was employed as "superintendent of affairs"; Elon Gardner as financial secretary; Joe Bragdon as private secretary; "Subway" Smith as counsel, and there were places in view for the other members. "I want the smartest apartment you can find, Nopper," he commanded. "Don't stop at expense. Have Pettingill redecorate it from top to bottom, Get the best servants you can find. I'm going to live, Nopper, and hang the buying car consequences." CHAPTER VI MONTY CRISTO A fortnight later Montgomery buying car buying car Brewster had a new home.

In strict obedience to his chief's command, "Nopper" Harrison had leased until the September following one of the most expensive apartments to be found in New York City. The rental was $23,000, and the shrewd financial representative had saved $1,000 for his employer by paying the sum in advance. But when he reported this bit of economy to Mr. Brewster he was surprised that it brought forth a frown. "I never saw a man who had less sense about money," muttered "Nopper" to himself.

"Why, he spends it like a ThirdPart400_500 Chicago millionaire trying to get into New York society. If it were not for the rest of us he'd be a pauper in six months." Paul Pettingill, to buying car his own intense surprise and, it must be said, consternation, was engaged to redecorate certain rooms according to a plan suggested by the tenant. The rising young artist, in a great flurry of excitement, agreed to do the work for $500, and then blushed like a schoolgirl when he was informed by buying car new the practical Brewster that the paints and material for one room alone would cost twice as much. "Petty, you have no more idea of business than a goat," criticised Montgomery, and

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Paul lowered his head in humble confession. "That man who calcimines your studio could figure on a piece of work with more intelligence than you reveal. I'll pay $2,500. It's only a fair price, and I can't afford anything cheap in this place." "At this rate you won't be able to afford anything," said Pettingill to himself. And so it was that Pettingill and a corps of decorators soon turned the rooms into a confusion of scaffoldings and buying car ThirdPart400_500 paint buckets, out of which in the end emerged something very distinguished. No one had ever thought Pettingill deficient in ideas, and this was his opportunity. The only drawback was the time limit which Brewster so remorselessly fixed. Without that he felt that he could have done something splendid in the way of decorative panels--something that would make even the glory of Puvis de Chavannes turn pallid. With it he was obliged to curb his turbulent ideas, and he decided that a ric ...

 
   
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